SSAT Flex Testing

Academics Plus is proud to serve as an official SSAT Flex Testing site to students who may benefit from a smaller, more "homey" testing environment. Flex testing is offered Monday-Friday mornings; however, Saturday appointments are available for an additional fee. A student does not need to have a diagnosed disability or formal accommodations, such as an IEP, in order to qualify for flex testing. Many students benefit from a more individualized, supportive environment. Flex testing scores are viewed the same as traditional SSAT scores by each school. 

To schedule a Flex Test:

  • Call our office at 404-816-0708 or fill out the form below to reserve a date for your child's SSAT to be administered at Academics Plus.

  • Once a test date is confirmed, one of our team members will email you with an access code to register with our testing facility. This email will also include test day instructions, so both you and your child know what to expect. If you still have specific questions about the process or logistics of test day, please feel free to reach out to us and we will be happy to help!

  • Once you receive the email with your access code, please go to www.ssat.org to register. Our test center code is 0113.

  • If you are requesting accommodations for your child, such as extended time or use of a laptop for the writing portion, you must get the approval from SSAT at least two weeks before the scheduled test date. In order to request accommodations, you must download the Special Accommodations form from the SSAT website and then have your child’s current school complete the form and send it directly to SSAT. You are responsible for providing the accommodations for your child.

  • After your child completes the test, we will mail it directly to the SSAT. You may request to have the scores emailed when you register; however, SSAT charges an additional fee for this service. According to the SSAT website, tests take approximately 10-14 days to be scored by their team.

  • Please note: our office does not receive a copy of the scores, and we are not responsible for scores being submitted to schools.


    If you have additional questions, please see the FAQs below or call our office to speak with a team member directly, 404-816-0708. We look forward to serving your family this admissions season!

Frequently Asked Questions

  • How often can I take the Flex test? The Flex test can be only be taken once per academic year (August 1st-July 31st of the following year).

  • When will I receive my scores? Our team will mail out your child’s scores on the same day they test (we are lucky enough to have a FedEx location in our building, making shipping quick and easy!). Your child’s test will take up to 2 business days to arrive at the SSAT office. SSAT policy states that they will then score your child’s test within 10-14 days.

  • What happens if we need to reschedule our Flex Test appointment due to illness, inclement weather, etc.? We are committed to providing a safe and healthy testing environment for your child. For that reason, if your student has had a fever, flu-like symptoms or a stomach virus within 48 hours prior to testing, please call and we will help you reschedule your child's test date. If your student arrives at our office and shows symptoms of being ill, we will ask you to take your child home and reschedule the test at a later date. If our office is closed due to weather, we will notify you as soon as that decision is made and will work with you to schedule a new test date. There is no additional charge for rescheduling a Flex Test for one of these reasons.

  • Can I get a refund for a Flex Test appointment if I change my mind? A 50% deposit is required at the time of scheduling your appointment and this fee is nonrefundable. The remaining 50% balance will be charged 72 hours prior to your test date. At this time, the full amount is nonrefundable.

  • If I add the list of schools I’m applying to when I register for the test date, will the scores be automatically sent? Yes. If you prefer to see all of your child’s scores before they are sent to schools, you can go back and add school recipients at a later date.

  • Do you offer tutoring for the SSAT?

    Although we do not offer tutoring for the SSAT, we have relationships with many wonderful SSAT tutors in the area. We are happy to provide you with their information if you send us an email with your request.

  • My child qualifies for accommodations and I plan to submit the request for accommodations when I register for the SSAT. What accommodations are you able to provide in the testing center?

    Academics Plus is committed to ensuring that students with disabilities receive all necessary and reasonable testing accommodations when taking the SSAT. If you feel your student may be eligible to receive testing accommodations when taking the SSAT, please submit your application on the SSAT website as soon as possible. Many of our students have found that it can take up to two (2) weeks for the review and processing of your child’s request for testing accommodations.

    Accommodations that your child may qualify for include:

    50% Extra Time (1.5x)

    Answer Directly in Test Book Calculator (4-function only; May contain %, √, +/-, M-, M+, and MRC)

    Laptop with Spell Check for Writing Sample (Cannot be used during other sections)

    Highlighter

    Ruler

    Graph Paper

    Small Group Setting (10 or fewer students in room)

    Prescription Medication with Water (Must be self-administered and in original prescription bottle)

    Reader (Provided by family; student will test individually)

    Scribe (Provided by family; student will test individually)

    Use of Gel Overlays

  • If my child takes the SSAT with accommodations, will the school be notified?

    No. SSAT score reports do NOT provide any notification that your student was provided testing accommodations.

 
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What to expect on the Middle Level SSAT:

Writing Sample

  • You will have a choice between two creative story starters.

  • What it measures: This gives admission officers a feel for how well you write and organize your ideas.

  • This section is not scored, but it is included with the score report you send to schools.

  • Time allotted: 25 minutes

At the beginning of the test, you are given 25 minutes to write a story based on one of two provided creative prompts. This writing sample is sent to the admission officers at the schools to which you send score reports, to help them assess your writing skills. This section is not scored, and it is not included in the student score report unless you purchase it separately.

Quantitative (Math) Section

  • Number of questions: 50, broken into two parts

  • What it measures: Your ability to solve problems involving arithmetic, elementary algebra, geometry, and other concepts

  • Scored section: Yes

  • Time allotted: 30 minutes for each section of 25 questions

The quantitative (mathematics) section of the Middle Level SSAT measures your knowledge of algebra, geometry, and other quantitative concepts. You do not require and may not use a calculator for this section.

Many of the questions that appear in the quantitative sections of the Middle Level SSAT are structured in mathematical terms that directly state the operation you need to perform; others may not. In these problems, carefully consider how the question is worded and the way the information is presented to determine the operation(s) to perform.

Reading Comprehension Section

  • Number of questions: 40

  • What it measures: Your ability to read and comprehend what you read

  • Scored section: Yes

  • Time allotted: 40 minutes

  • Topics covered: Reading passages generally range in length from 250 to 350 words and may be taken from:

• Literary fiction
• Humanities (biography, art, poetry)
• Science (anthropology, astronomy, medicine)
• Social studies (history, sociology, economics)

  • Questions related to the passage may ask you to:

• Recognize the main idea
• Locate details
• Make inferences
• Derive the meaning of a word or phrase from its context
• Determine the author’s purpose
• Determine the author’s attitude and tone
• Understand and evaluate opinions/arguments
• Make predictions based on information in the passage

By presenting passages and questions about them, the reading comprehension section measures your ability to understand what you read. After you read each passage, you’ll be asked questions about its content or about the author’s style, intent, or point of view. In general, the SSAT uses two types of writing: narrative, which includes excerpts from novels, poems, short stories, or essays; and argument, which presents a definite point of view about a subject.

Verbal Section

  • Number of questions: 60; 30 synonyms and 30 analogies

  • What it measures: Vocabulary, verbal reasoning, and ability to relate ideas logically

  • Scored section: Yes

  • Time allotted: 30 minutes

  • Topics covered: This section covers word similarities and relationships through synonyms and analogies.

The verbal section of the Middle Level SSAT asks you identify synonyms and to interpret analogies. The synonym questions test the strength of your vocabulary. The analogy questions measure your ability to relate ideas to each other logically.

Synonyms are words that have the same or nearly the same meaning as another word. For example, fortunate is a synonym for luckytidy is a synonym for neat, and difficult is a synonym for hard. You must choose the answer word that has a meaning similar to the given word.

Analogies are comparisons between two things that are usually seen as different but have some similarities. These types of comparisons play an important role in improving problem-solving and decision-making skills, in perception and memory, in communication and reasoning skills, and in reading and building vocabulary. Analogies help you process information actively, make important decisions, and improve understanding and long-term memory. Considering these relationships stimulates critical and creative thinking.

Experimental Section

  • Number of questions: 16

  • What it measures: New questions are continuously being tested for future SSAT forms. These questions appear on the SSAT to ensure they are reliable, secure, and acceptable.

  • Scored section: No

  • Time allotted: 15 minutes

  • Topics covered: This section contains six verbal, five reading, and five quantitative questions for you to answer.


What to expect on the Upper Level SSAT:

Writing Sample

  • You have a choice between two prompts - one creative and one traditional essay.

  • The writing sample gives admission officers a feel for how well you write and organize your ideas.

  • The writing sample is not scored, but it is included with the score reports that you send to schools.

  • Time allotted: 25 minutes

At the beginning of the test, you will be asked to write an essay or a story in 25 minutes. You are given a choice between two prompts: one creative writing prompt and one essay-type prompt. This writing sample is sent to the admission officers at the schools to which you send score reports, to help them assess your writing skills. This section is not scored, and it is not included in the student score report unless you purchase it separately.

Quantitative (Math) Section

  • Number of questions: 50, given in two 30-minute sections

  • What it measures: Your ability to solve problems involving arithmetic, elementary algebra, geometry, and other concepts

  • Scored section: Yes

  • Time allotted: 30 minutes for each section of 25 questions

  • The quantitative (mathematics) section of the Upper Level SSAT measures your knowledge of algebra, geometry, and other quantitative concepts. You do not require and may not use a calculator for this section.

Many of the questions that appear in the quantitative sections of the Upper Level SSAT are structured in mathematical terms that directly state the operation you need to perform; others may not. In these problems, carefully consider how the question is worded and the way the information is presented to determine the operation(s) to perform.

Reading Comprehension Section

  • Number of questions: 40

  • What it measures: Your ability to read and comprehend what you read

  • Scored section: Yes

  • Time allotted: 40 minutes

  • Topics covered: Reading passages generally range in length from 250 to 350 words and may be taken from:

• Literary fiction 
• Humanities (biography, art, poetry) 
• Science (anthropology, astronomy, medicine) 
• Social studies (history, sociology, economics)

Questions related to the passage may ask you to:

• Recognize the main idea

• Locate details

• Make inferences

• Derive the meaning of a word or phrase from its context

• Determine the author's purpose

• Determine the author's attitude and tone

• Understand and evaluate opinions/arguments

• Make predictions based on information in the passage

By presenting passages and questions about them, the reading comprehension section measures your ability to understand what you read. After you read each passage, you’ll be asked questions about its content or about the author’s style, intent, or point of view. In general, the SSAT uses two types of writing: narrative, which includes excerpts from novels, poems, short stories, or essays; and argument, which presents a definite point of view about a subject.

Verbal Section

  • Number of questions: 60; 30 synonyms and 30 analogies

  • What it measures: Vocabulary, verbal reasoning, and ability to relate ideas logically

  • Scored section: Yes

  • Time allotted: 30 minutes

  • Topics covered: This section covers word similarities and relationships through synonyms and analogies.

The verbal section of the Upper Level SSAT asks you identify synonyms and to interpret analogies. The synonym questions test the strength of your vocabulary. The analogy questions measure your ability to relate ideas to each other logically.

Synonyms are words that have the same or nearly the same meaning as another word. For example, fortunate is a synonym for lucky, tidy is a synonym for neat, and difficult is a synonym for hard. You must choose the answer word that has a meaning similar to the given word.

Analogies are comparisons between two things that are usually seen as different but have some similarities. These types of comparisons play an important role in improving problem-solving and decision-making skills, in perception and memory, in communication and reasoning skills, and in reading and building vocabulary. Analogies help you process information actively, make important decisions, and improve understanding and long-term memory. Considering these relationships stimulates critical and creative thinking.

Experimental Section

  • Number of questions: 16

  • What it measures: New questions are continuously being tested for future SSAT forms. These questions appear on the SSAT to ensure they are reliable, secure, and acceptable.

  • Scored section: No

  • Time allotted: 15 minutes

  • Topics covered: This section contains six verbal, five reading, and five quantitative questions.